Perth CBD cannot possibly sustain itself, unless?

Who’s sustaining the 14,000 businesses in the Perth CBD?

Companies are increasingly changing the way they do business in their endeavour to become more holistic and effective.

The need for employees to visit the outside world from their city towers during the day becomes less frequent.

Hot desks, innovative and relaxed work spaces, the new espresso coffee machine in the lunch room helps keep employees within the parameters of their office.

Technology has disrupted the way we do business in ways we’ve never dreamed of just a few short years ago and the city towers are no longer the office factories they once were.

Considering the above, who’s keeping the doors open to the thousands of businesses on streets below?

With less than 25,000 residents that are mostly on the outskirts of the CBD, it’s not a surprise that small business operators struggle to keep their doors open.

Each year we will continue to see the Perth CBD become more and more white-anted unless there’s a dramatic change in its planning scheme.

Traditional city planning perhaps up to ten to fifteen years ago wouldn’t have dreamed the amount of disruption in the way we do business, would effect the top end of town.

Perth CBD as we’ve come to know it must change to Perth Global City, to become the anchor once again for the state of Western Australia. Currently it looks like a ghost town on the streets and its aged planning scheme is un-inviting to world class opportunity.

Let’s get the ball rolling

Its not rocket science. Increasing its current 25,000 residents to 120,000 residents, students and tourists would easily keep the doors open of 14,000 businesses and more.

We can’t rest on our past success and traditions, we must be current and relevant. Perth must reframe itself, no longer as the most isolated city in the world but perfectly positioned within the world’s fastest growing economies, Asia.

Where do we start to bring transformational change to our city that effects our future prosperity of our state?

It must start at a state level planning to overhaul its current encumbrances and open its own doors to untapped potential and investment.

Rather than blame the economy, bad government or technology, now is the time for true leadership and decision making.

I’ve searched high and low for a vision of Perth’s future that excites me. I still can’t see anything that remotely answers some of the challenges we face.

Smart City Perth ‘Developing a global city with a social conscience’ is a collaborative effort of those that have a vision and the will to see it through.

We are at the very beginning of a new economic wave worldwide and we must jump on it now.